Andrew Lambirth

‘Capel-y-ffin’, 1926–7 (watercolour and gouache)

David Jones: painter, poet and mystic

David Jones (1895–1974) was a remarkable figure: artist and poet, he was a great original in both disciplines. His was…

Forces of nature: Maggi Hambling with ‘Amy Winehouse’, a painting exhibited at her Walls of Water show last year
‘Hat Stand’, 1969, one of a group of three sculptures that caused controversy early on in the artist’s career

The pop artist whose transgressions went too far – for the PC art world

After years of being effectively banned from exhibiting in his own country, Allen Jones finally reaches the RA with his first major UK retrospective. Andrew Lambirth meets him

‘Winter Landscape (Winterlandschaft)’, 1970, by Anselm Kiefer

All my doubts about Anselm Kiefer are blown away by his Royal Academy show

In the Royal Academy’s courtyard are two large glass cases or vitrines containing model submarines. In one the sea has…

‘Water-meadows near Salisbury’, 1829/30, by John Constable

Curator-driven ambitions mar this Constable show at the V&A

The V&A has an unparalleled collection of hundreds of works by John Constable (1776–1837), but hardly anyone seems to know…

‘14.11.65’ by John Hoyland

Is John Hoyland the new Turner?

What happens to an artist’s reputation when he dies? Traditionally, there was a period of cooling off when the reputation,…

‘Moonrise and Pale Dancer’ by Derek Hyatt

The man who brought Cubism to New York

The American Jewish artist Max Weber (1881–1961) was born in Belostok in Russia (now Bialystok in Poland), and although he…

‘A Battery Shelled’, 1919, by Percy Wyndham Lewis

The Imperial War Museum finds a deadly place to display first world war masterpieces

The Imperial War Museum has reopened after a major refit and looks pretty dapper, even though it was overrun by…

Still Life with Carrots (c. 1921) by Duncan Grant

The Bloomsbury painters bore me

Virginia Woolf (1882–1941) claimed that nothing has really happened until it has been recorded, so this new exhibition at the…

‘I wish my boyfriend was as dirty as your policies’, 2011,by Coral Stoakes

Agitprop, love trucks and leaflet bombs: the art of protest

Titles can be misleading, and in case you have visions of microwave ovens running amok or washing machines crunching up…

‘Futurist Motif’, 1920, by Gerardo Dottori

Futurism’s escape to the country

Futurism, with its populist mix of explosive rhetoric (burn all the museums!) and resolutely urban experience and emphasis on speed,…

‘The Sutherland Cup’ by Angie Lewin

The perfect excuse to get out all the best Ravilious china

A day trip to the Towner Art Gallery in Eastbourne is a summer pleasure, and two concurrent shows are proving…

‘Equivalents for the Megaliths’, 1935, by Paul Nash

A lost opportunity to show John Nash at his best

John Northcote Nash (1893–1977) was the younger brother of Paul Nash (1889–1946), and has been long overshadowed by Paul, though…

‘Goose Woman’, c.1840, by George Smart

Why did it take so long to recognise the worth of British folk art?

British folk art has been shamefully neglected in the land of its origin, as if the popular handiwork of past…

‘The Scyther (Mower)’, 1912, by Kazimir Malevich

Malevich: Are Tate visitors ready for this master of modernism?

Kazimir Malevich (1879–1935) is one of the founding fathers of Modernism, and as such entirely deserves the in-depth treatment with…

‘Paul Newman’, 1964, by Dennis Hopper

Had Hollywood not lured him away, Dennis Hopper could have made his name as a photographer

In an age when photographs have swollen out of all proportion to their significance, and are mounted on wall-sized light…

‘Hawk Pouncing on Partridges’, c.1827, by John James Audubon

Painted, sculpted and stuffed: a history of the bird in art

These days, as the sparrows and starlings so common in my youth are growing scarce, there’s less need for a…

‘After the Bath (Le repos après bain)’, 1897, by Edgar Degas, at Stephen Ongpin

Charles Hadcock – taking on the age of speculation with sculpture in the City

As the boundary between auction house and art dealer blurs yet further, with auctioneers acting increasingly by private treaty as…

‘Tondo the Winged Hours of the Seabirds’ by Keith Grant

Oceans and forests in kaleidoscopic flow – discovering Keith Grant

For decades I’ve been aware of the work of Keith Grant (born 1930), but it is only in recent years…

Inspired and springing draughtsmanship: ‘Femme dans la nuit’, 18 April 1945, by Jean Miró

The painter who channelled the forces of gravity

Tragically, Ian Welsh (1944–2014) did not live to see this exhibition of his latest work. Diagnosed with terminal cancer on…

‘Prince Pig’s Courtship’ by Paula Rego

The Royal Academy Summer Exhibition offers up the good, the bad and the ugly – and a sore neck

One of the great traditions of the RA’s Summer Exhibition has always been that each work submitted was seen in…

‘Coventry Cathedral’, 1940, by John Piper

Kenneth Clark wasn’t happy simply popularising art, he liked to collect it and shape it too

Earlier this year, I sat down and watched Kenneth Clark’s groundbreaking TV series Civilisation. I vaguely remember when it was…

‘Stranger III’, 1959, by Lynn Chadwick

Can Lynn Chadwick finally escape the 1950?

Lynn Chadwick was born 100 years ago in London, and died in 2003 at his Gloucestershire home, Lypiatt Park, where…

‘Steps’, 1931, by Josef Albers

Josef Albers: roaring diagonals and paradisiacal squares

Josef Albers (1888–1976) is best known for his long engagement with the square, which he painted in exquisite variation more…

‘Stratford St Mary’, 2012, by Justin Partyka

A photographer sheds new light on Constable Country

Andrew Lambirth talks to Justin Partyka, whose photographs show Constable Country in an unexpected light