‘14.11.65’ by John Hoyland

Is John Hoyland the new Turner?

What happens to an artist’s reputation when he dies? Traditionally, there was a period of cooling off when the reputation,…

‘Modern Family’, 2014, byEd Fornieles,at Chisenhale Gallery

‘Likes’, lacquered cherry pies and Anselm Kiefer: the weird world of post-internet art

In the mid-1990s the art world got excited about internet art (or ‘’, as those involved styled it). This new…

Portrait of a couple as Isaac and Rebecca, known as ‘The Jewish Bride’, c.1665, by Rembrandt

Why everyone loves Rembrandt

Talking of Rembrandt’s ‘The Jewish Bride’ to a friend, Vincent van Gogh went — characteristically — over the top. ‘I…

‘A Battery Shelled’, 1919, by Percy Wyndham Lewis

The Imperial War Museum finds a deadly place to display first world war masterpieces

The Imperial War Museum has reopened after a major refit and looks pretty dapper, even though it was overrun by…

‘I wish my boyfriend was as dirty as your policies’, 2011,by Coral Stoakes

Agitprop, love trucks and leaflet bombs: the art of protest

Titles can be misleading, and in case you have visions of microwave ovens running amok or washing machines crunching up…

‘He thought he could have made it as a visual artist — if only more people had liked his work.’ Above: John Arlott reading (1977) and Kathy and Jessy (1963)

The gentle intoxications of Laurie Lee

On Laurie Lee’s centenary, Jeremy Treglown wonders how the writer’s legacy stands up


Why the BBC will never match Kenneth Clark’s Civilisation

No modern critic would dare match Kenneth Clark’s fearless way with sweeping statements

Della Francesca’s ‘Resurrection’

The mathematical revolution behind ‘the greatest picture in the world’

The Indian inspiration with which Piero della Francesca created ‘the greatest picture in the world’


This beautiful new history of Kew Gardens needs a bit of weeding

Edward Bawden’s Kew Gardens is a beautiful book. Lovers of early 20th-century British art will find it hard to stop…

American novelist Siri Hustvedt Photo: Getty

Caught between a New Age rock and a theory junkie hard place

Siri Hustvedt’s new novel isn’t exactly an easy read — but the casual bookshop browser should be reassured that it’s…

The Hunters in the Snow, 1565, by Pieter Brueghel Photo: De Agostini/Getty

A spirit to warm Bruegel’s ‘Hunters in the Snow’

The ostensible subject matter is misleading, as is any conflation with his lesser relatives’ wassailing peasants and roistering village squares.…


Clarissa Tan's Notebook: Why I stopped drinking petrol

Florence was in fog the day I arrived. Its buildings were bathed in white cloud, its people moved as though…

Saving Italy, by Robert M. Edsel - a review

During the civil war, the Puritan iconoclast William Dowsing recorded with satisfaction his destructive visit in 1644 to the parish…


When a smartphone gallery is better than the real thing

Michael Prodger finds that new technology is transforming how we experience art – in galleries, on computers and on smartphones too

Christopher Sykes’s diary: David Hockney, Bridlington lobster, and the risks of a third martini

I began my week with a trip to Bridlington, the closest seaside town to my childhood home. ‘Brid’, as it’s…

‘Artist’s Studio “Look Mickey”’, 1973, by Roy Lichtenstein

How Roy Lichtenstein became weighed down with superficiality

Andrew Lambirth finds that Roy Lichtenstein became weighed down with superficiality


An enigma wrapped in a conundrum

What to make of Banksy? Artist or vandal? Tate Modern holds no Banksys and, other than a redundant phone box…


The picture of health

It must have been hard to settle on a title for this book; but then this is not the book…


Bookends: Disarming but disingenuous

At first glance, Be the Worst You Can Be (Booth-Clibborn Editions, £9.99) by Charles Saatchi (pictured above with his wife,…


Where dreams take shape

The question of what artists actually get up to in their studios has always intrigued the rest of us —…


A fine and private painter

Prunella Clough was a modest and self-effacing artist who nevertheless produced some of the most consistently original and innovative British…


Portraits of an age

By a fine coincidence, two legendary icons of British art were being feted in London on the same evening last…


Currents of imagery

In the first book of his scientific-cum-philosophical poem ‘De rerum Natura’ — or ‘On the Nature of Things’ — Lucretius…


Oh brother!

Long in the writing, deep in research, heavy to hold, this is the latest of umpteen biographies of Vincent van…

Settling old scores

As a boy, Brian Sewell was unimpressed by opera but enraptured by pantomime which, he reveals in Outsider, sowed in…