Stop shouting at Hilary Mantel – there are real outrages to address

2 March 2013 9:00 am

It started the other week, when David Cameron was in India. Although it started like a bout of malaria starts,…


Sorry, but Parliament is full of sex pests

2 March 2013 9:00 am

In Westminster, ‘inappropriate behaviour’ is a way of life – and the Lib Dems are the worst offenders


Thinly veiled threats

2 March 2013 9:00 am

A new kind of unrest is making itself felt throughout the Arab world. Women are beginning to assert themselves and voice their frustrations, says Caroline Moorehead

Of vice and verse

2 March 2013 9:00 am

‘All human life is binary’, explains a Vestal Virgin to the time-travelling heroine of Ranjit Bolt’s verse novel, Losing It.…

Long life

2 March 2013 9:00 am

Eight years ago I was in Rome for The Spectator to write a piece about the election of a new…


Bookends: A life of gay abandon

17 March 2012 9:00 am

Sometimes, only the purest smut will do. Scotty Bowers’s memoir, Full Service: My Adventures in Hollywood and the Secret Sex…


More sinned against than sinning

25 February 2012 10:00 am

When I saw the title of this book, then read that it only covered the period 1600-1800 I hoped this…


Acting strange

11 September 2010 12:00 am

Reviewing Lindsay Clarke’s Whitbread-winning The Chymical Wedding a small matter of 20 years ago, and noting its free and easy cast and wistful nods in the direction of the Age of Aquarius, I eventually pronounced that it was a ‘hippy novel’.


The French connection

7 August 2010 12:00 am

If ever there was a novel to which that old adage about not judging a book by its cover could be applied, it’s this one.


Same old perversions

24 July 2010 12:00 am

Memory Lane always looked so unthreatening to me.

Physical and spiritual decay

7 July 2010 12:00 am

The most striking thing about Piers Paul Read’s early novels was their characters’ susceptibility to physical decay.


Schlock teaser

30 June 2010 12:00 am

The somewhat straightlaced theatre-going audiences of 1880s America, eager for performances by European artistes like Jenny Lind and solid, home-grown, classical actors such as Otis Skinner, were hardly prepared for the on-stage vulgarity that the (usually) Russian and Polish immigrant impressarios, with their particular nous for show-biz, were to unleash into the saloons and fleapits across the young nation.


A rather orthodox doxy

16 June 2010 12:00 am

‘His cursed concubine.’ That was the imperial ambassador Eustace Chapuys’ judgment on Henry VIII’s second wife, Anne Boleyn.


Cherchez la femme

12 May 2010 12:00 am

The 22nd Earl of Erroll, Military Secretary in Kenya in the early part of the second world war, was described by two of his fellow peers of the realm as ‘a stoat — one of the great pouncers of all time’ and ‘a dreadful shit who really needed killing’.


The ultimate price

21 April 2010 12:00 am

Lesley Downer is one of the most unusual authors writing in English.


Fine artist, but a dirty old man

31 March 2010 12:00 am

I have always been sceptical of those passages in the ‘Ancestry’ chapters of biographies that run something like this: Through his veins coursed the rebellious blood of the Vavasours, blended with a more temperate strain from the Mudge family of Basingstoke.

A narrow escape

24 February 2010 12:00 am

For once, I felt sorry for Bill Clinton.


Throw it in a stream

24 February 2010 12:00 am

I know a British couple with a Chinese daugh- ter, pretty and fluent in English.


From gloom to dispair

17 February 2010 12:00 am

In little more than a decade, the cosy world of Anglo-American crime fiction has been transformed by wave after wave of Scandinavian invaders.


Not ‘a boy-crazed trollop’

17 February 2010 12:00 am

For someone who barely left the house, Emily Dickinson didn’t half cause a lot of trouble.


An institution to love and cherish

3 February 2010 12:00 am

Books about marriage, like the battered old institution itself, come in and out of fashion with writers, readers and politicians, but never quite die away.


It happened one summer

3 February 2010 12:00 am

For those unfamiliar with Martin Amis’s short story, ‘What Happened to Me on My Holiday’, written for The New Yorker in 1997, it was a purist exercise in autobiographical fiction; not even the names were changed.


What a difference a gay makes

20 January 2010 12:00 am

Edmund White is among the most admired of living authors, his oeuvre consisting of 20-odd books of various forms — novels, stories, essays and biographies — though each one is imbued with his preferred subject, homosexuality.

A lost masterpiece?

25 November 2009 12:00 am

These long anticipated literary mysteries never end in anything very significant — one thinks of Harold Brodkey’s The Runaway Soul, falling totally flat after decades of sycophantic pre-publicity, or Truman Capote’s Answered Prayers, emerging in fragments in 1975, after 17 years of non-work, to scandal but no acclaim.

Surprising literary ventures

21 October 2009 12:00 am

Love Letters of a Japanese begins: ‘These letters are real.